Cruising to Honfleur, France


Honfleur tourist information.

Honfleur, FranceHonfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie’s seaside towns is a city in northern France’s Lower Normandy region, sited on the estuary where the Seine river meets the English Channel. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, has been a subject for artists including Claude Monet and native son Eugène Boudin. Nearby Saint Catherine’s Church is a vaulted wooden structure erected by shipbuilders beginning in the mid-1400s.

Honfleur has preserved many historic and traditional buildings and houses some interesting museums, churches and monuments. Come to the harbour before high tide, and you can watch the daily return of its fleet of 40 or so fishing boats, a memory of a time when Honfleur’s ships skirted Newfoundland in search of cod, and its explorers sailed the shores of America seeking the elusive passage to the west. The Old Dock is surrounded by picturesque narrow houses, the Lieutenancy and St Stephen’s Church – without doubt this is what catches the eye of every visitor upon their first visit to Honfleur.

Areas of Honfleur

L’Enclos
L’Enclos is the oldest and most visited part of Honfleur lies within the area of the Hôtel de Ville, with the old port (Vieux Bassin),the deconsecrated church of Saint-Etienne, the remains of the old prison (nowadays, the Normandy Cultural Museum) and the original 17th century Salt Halls (Greniers à Sel), now used for exhibitions, conferences and concerts.

Sainte-Catherine Church

Around the largest wooden church with a separate belltower in France are narrow streets with the best restaurants and art galleries. This stunning edifice, built entirely of wood, was made by shipwrights, who incorporated many remarkable decorative details.

Côte de Grâce
From the Côte de Grâce, the hill some 1,5 km from the town centre, are spectacular views of the Seine estuary, the harbour and Le Havre. Nearby is one of the region’s oldest sanctuary chapels, Notre Dame de Grâce, founded by Richard II and rebuilt between 1600 and 1615.